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March 6th, 2001 - LiveJournal Development — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
LiveJournal Development

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March 6th, 2001

no SQL [Mar. 6th, 2001|01:55 am]
LiveJournal Development

lj_dev

[bradfitz]
I just realized I forgot to include the SQL to create all the tables if you were going to try and install and run the livejournal source on your own server. This wasn't intentional, but I think now maybe it's a good thing--- it'll force people to read the code and not just try and get it to run.

The officially released version will have all the create tables and inserts for the lookup tables.

g'night
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Underscores in user names and security [Mar. 6th, 2001|10:59 am]
LiveJournal Development

lj_dev

[steve]
There seems to be a security problem when using user names with underscores. When I visit lj_abuse.livejournal.com no journal entries are displayed. However, visiting lj-abuse.livejournal.com or www.livejournal.com/users/lj_abuse I see all my protected entries just like they are supposed to be (I'm logged in). I should be able to see them when using lj_abuse.livejournal.com, right? I believe this means there's some type of bug that affects the translation of usernames from "_" to "-" or vice versa.
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(no subject) [Mar. 6th, 2001|01:15 pm]
LiveJournal Development

lj_dev

[pvx]
Open membership, hooray. Let's start out with something trivial.

Is there any particular reason only certain html tags are allowed in comments, while any are allowed in posts? In any case, <span> should be allowed, it's quite useful for throwing in little formatting tweaks.
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Documentation [Mar. 6th, 2001|07:45 pm]
LiveJournal Development

lj_dev

[seadawg]
I know there are probably plenty of coders who will be contributing who probably know Perl a lot better than me, I thought I'd help out with documentation. It doesn't look like anyone has really taken any strides yet, so I'll take a quick stab at it.

I think the best way to go about documentation would be to do it like the PHP Manual. I've found their function references extremely helpful before, and the user comments make it a lot easier, since many post example code. Something like that for the LJ API would be pretty useful.

Basically, what should be done is classify every function into categories (user functions, scheme functions, maintenance, etc), then do a write up on how each function works (pseudo code style, with some english), the inputs/outputs, and link referrals to similar functions or functions it uses.

Any suggestions? I wouldn't mind spending some time creating a quick database/page for everything.
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Network errors [Mar. 6th, 2001|10:32 pm]
LiveJournal Development

lj_dev

[bradfitz]
I keep getting messages like this on lj-kenny (freebsd box):

DBI->connect(livejournal:lj-co-cartman) failed: Can't create TCP/IP socket (55) at /home/lj/cgi-bin/ljconfig.pl line 33

Why is this? What netstat, /proc, or sysctl like things can I check to see why sockets aren't being created reliably?
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64-bit db server? [Mar. 6th, 2001|11:53 pm]
LiveJournal Development

lj_dev

[bradfitz]
Mark says:
Yeah. What concerns is how well the hardware we buy now will fit into our ultimate, highly scalable infrastructure.

In other words, if we have 200,000 users someday soon and need 64-bit multiple CPU machines to a future where we might grow 60K to 80K in a month, will we be able to use what we have spent previously, or will old hardware be a burden to us, with the previous investment actually making it harder to justify biting the bullet and buy the heavy equipment.

I wish I had a better way of judging our potential size and growth rate. Keep in mind that I'm working off of conservative figures, and assuming a decrease in the growth rate. The only problem is that our growth rate has been increasing lately...
So, should we buy some Alphas next? I've never owned or bought a non-x86 processor. 64-bit processors are nearly a requirement for big databases, though, if you want it to be fast. Thoughts?
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